Family Matters

Why Spanking Doesn’t Work

A new analysis concludes that spanking fails to alter kids' behavior in the long term. What it does instead is amp up their aggression.

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Want your kid to stop whatever dangerous/annoying/forbidden behavior he’s doing right now? Spanking will probably work — for now.

But be prepared for that same child to be more aggressive toward you and his siblings, his friends and his eventual spouse. Oh, and get ready for some other antisocial behaviors too.

A new analysis of two decades of research on the long-term effects of physical punishment in children concludes that spanking doesn’t work and can actually wreak havoc on kids’ long-term development, according to an article published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Studying physical punishment is difficult for researchers, who can’t randomly assign children to groups that are hit and those that aren’t. Instead, they follow children over many years, monitor how much they’re spanked, and then take measure of their aggression over time. “We find children who are physically punished get more aggressive over time and those who are not physically punished get less aggressive over time,” says Joan Durrant, the article’s lead author and a child clinical psychologist and professor of family social sciences at the University of Manitoba.

In fact, regardless of the age of the children or the size of the sample, none of more than 80 studies on the effects of physical punishment have succeeded in finding positive associations. “If someone were to hit us to change our behavior, it might harm our relationship with that person. We might feel resentful,” says Durrant. “It’s no different for children. It’s not a constructive thing to do.”

(MORE: The Healthland Podcast: Spanking, Drinking and Mind Control)

Children who are spanked may feel depressed and devalued, and their sense of self-worth can suffer. Harsh punishments can wind up backfiring because they can foster lying in children who are desperate to avoid being spanked. Later in life, physical punishment is linked to mental-health problems including depression, anxiety and drug and alcohol use. There’s neuroimaging evidence that physical punishment may alter parts of the brain involved in performance on IQ tests and up the likelihood of substance abuse. And there’s also early data that spanking could affect areas of the brain involved in emotion and stress regulation.

Yet, as I wrote last summer in a story about the first real-time study of parents spanking their children, some research has found that up to 90% of parents say they use corporal punishment:

Despite a battery of disciplinary techniques, including the infamous “time out,” redirection and the increasing emphasis on positive discipline (try substituting “hold the cup carefully” for “don’t spill your juice”), spanking and slapping are still pretty popular.

Moms and dads who spank do so because they believe it’s effective, and research actually shows that it is — in the short term. A child reaching for a tempting object will stop if he gets swatted. “It does work in the immediate moment, but beyond that, in most cases, it’s very ineffective,” says George Holden, the study’s author and a professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University. “The most common long-term consequence is that children learn to use aggression.”

Case in point: one mother in the study hit her toddler after the toddler either hit or kicked the mother, admonishing, “This is to help you remember not to hit your mother.”

“The irony is just amazing,” says Holden.

In some countries, spanking is not a choice. Durrant is currently living in Sweden, where she’s researching child-and-family policies and the evolution of that country’s law prohibiting physical discipline of children. In 1979, Sweden was the first country to pass such legislation; now 32 countries — including much of Europe, Costa Rica, Israel, Tunisia and Kenya — have a similar law.

Neither the U.S. nor Canada has gotten on board. “Whenever I mention the law, there is an assumption that this is government telling me how to raise my child,” says Durrant. “[But in Sweden] they see it as a way to make sure children get the best start possible in life.”

(MORE: The Case of the Texas Judge: When Does Spanking Cross the Line to Abuse?)

Parents who spank often do so by default. Many, particularly those who were hit themselves, find that spanking is the only disciplinary tactic in their toolbox. Doctors are in a position to change that by educating parents about the stages of normal child development, recommending alternative ways to discipline and referring interested parents to appropriate resources and parenting classes. In Sweden, for example, new parents are hooked up with support groups and given information about developmental stages.

As a result, parents understand their children aren’t being intentional obstructionists; it’s just par for the course. “When children see someone resolve conflict with aggression, they are more likely to learn that behavior,” says Durrant. “Two-year-olds are the most aggressive people in the world. They don’t understand the impact of their behavior, and they can’t inhibit themselves. So the more a child sees someone resolving conflict with aggression, the more aggressive they become.”

A young toddler who upends her cereal bowl on her head probably isn’t being ornery; she’s just curious to see what will happen. Durrant likes to use her son as an example. When he was 3, he dropped his dad’s toothbrush into the toilet. Another parent might have yelled, but Durrant’s academic background helped her realize that he was just experimenting: he dropped objects into water floating in sinks and bathtubs with nary a scolding; why not toilets too? “I explained what goes into toilets and then said, Do you think Daddy is going to want to put that toothbrush in his mouth now?” Message transmitted with no yelling.

P.S. Durrant’s son never dropped anything verboten into the toilet again.

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8 comments
LetitiaBrock
LetitiaBrock

I don't think dropping a toothbrush into the toilet would warrant a spanking. Me and my brothers all got spankings and we are very succesful and have never hit anyone.  One person's oopinoin that i totally disagree with.

fancytechno
fancytechno

These things always say what not to do instead of recommend what to do, which is the problem. Not everything is as innocently simple as the supplied toothbrush story.

LYRichardson
LYRichardson

There is a HUGE difference between a beating and a spanking, one BRUISES the other STINGS. It's like the difference between punishing and disciplining. 

Mookienuke
Mookienuke

I was spanked and have never put my hands on a woman or even called a woman out of name. Also I'm far frome aggressive. So who's doing these studies?

BrettBenischek
BrettBenischek

@LYRichardson That's not a huge difference. The action is the same--you are still hitting a child.

MattLoveless
MattLoveless

You're what's called the "exception" as opposed to the "rule". It's great that you don't hit women, but the study suggests that getting hit by your parents doesn't help.

Thanks to spanking/belts, I was taught that the solution to a problem was violence, aggression, and fear. And while I too have never hit another person or an animal, the emotional toll that took as an adolescent was pretty severe. Fortunately for some people, including myself, it's possible to overcome that when you get to age 15, 16 and lead an aggression-less life, but hitting makes that more difficult.

I always say, if you can't be more creative in your discipline than inflicting physical harm, then parenting may not be for you.

Also the statement: "(insert parental misstep here) and I turned out fine" is the worst defense for bad behavior I've ever heard of.

LetitiaBrock
LetitiaBrock

@MattLoveless 

I think the study is biased. There could be a millioin reasons why children are aggressive and it doesn't have to do anything with them getting a spanking. My parent spanked but I always knew I was love, cared for and protected.  it didn't kill us and we're all successful, never been to jail, or anything.

LetitiaBrock
LetitiaBrock

@MattLoveless 

Bad behavior is just that. when it happens, take care ot it. A lot of parents do nothing. If there are no consequences. then they repeat the behavior.