Is Eating Eggs Really as Bad for Your Heart as Smoking?

A new study suggests that eating three whole eggs a week can thicken the arteries as much as smoking. Some heart experts say not so fast

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Is your breakfast omelet harming your heart? A recent study by researchers at Western University in Canada found that the more egg yolks people ate, the thicker their artery walls became — an indicator of heart disease risk — and that the effect was almost as bad as from smoking cigarettes.

In the study, the researchers measured carotid plaque build-up in the arteries of 1,231 men and women, average age 62, who were seeking care at cardiovascular-health clinics. Participants filled out questionnaires detailing lifestyle habits including medication use, cigarette smoking and egg-yolk consumption. The researchers gauged how much people smoked and how many egg yolks they ate over time, by calculating their “pack-years” (the number of packs of cigarettes people smoked per day multiplied by the number of years they spent smoking) and “egg-yolk years” (how many egg yolks they ate per week for how many years).

After about age 40, participants’ plaque began building up steadily, but among the participants who ate the most eggs — three or more yolks per week — that build-up increased “exponentially,” the study found. As people’s egg-yolk years went up, so did their plaque accumulation — an association that was independent of factors like gender, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, smoking, body mass index and diabetes.

(MORE: Good News, Kids Cholesterol Levels Are Down)

Among the 20% of participants who ate the most eggs, the carotid plaque build-up was about two-thirds that of the study’s heaviest smokers. The researchers concluded that the plaque increase from eating eggs “follows a similar pattern to that of cigarette smoking.”

Arterial accumulation of plaque is a key risk factor for heart attack and stroke. As plaque builds up, it thickens artery walls and narrows the space through which blood can flow, forcing the heart to pump harder. If plaques become unstable, they can break off and form clots, which can halt blood flow to either the brain or the heart, causing stroke or heart attack.

The authors argue that their findings should quell doubts over the link between high dietary cholesterol and heart disease. “The prevailing tendency to ignore dietary cholesterol as a risk factor for coronary heart disease requires reassessment, including the consumption of cholesterol from eggs,” the authors wrote.

The government’s dietary guidelines recommend that adults consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day. One whole egg contains about 180 mg of cholesterol, nearly two-thirds of your daily recommended ma.

“The mantra ‘eggs can be part of a healthy diet for healthy people’ has confused the issue. It has been known for a long time that a high cholesterol intake increases the risk of cardiovascular events, and egg yolks have a very high cholesterol content,” study author Dr. David Spence, a professor of neurology at western’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, said in a statement. “In diabetics, an egg a day increases coronary risk by two- to five-fold.

(MORE: The Four Foods that Lower Your Cholesterol)

However, the study’s findings raised brows among other health experts, ABC News reports:

[C]ardiologists say the study shouldn’t be taken so seriously because the research is flawed.

“This is very poor quality research that should not influence patient’s dietary choices,” said Dr. Steven Nissen, who chairs the department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, in an email. “It is extremely important to understand the differences between ‘association’ and ‘causation’.”

Nissen said the researchers relied on patients to recall how many eggs they consumed, but asked them once and assumed it remained constant, which isn’t reliable. He said the way researchers measured patients’ plaque has come under “considerable criticism,” and that researchers failed to adjust for other dietary factors.

Indeed, it’s possible that the people who ate a lot of eggs also tended to eat a lot of other high-fat, high-salt or high-cholesterol foods. Or maybe they also tended to exercise less.

The researchers say that while further studies are needed to flesh out the association, people at risk for heart disease should still refrain from eating egg yolks on a regular basis.

The study is published in the journal Atherosclerosis.

MORE: NYC’s Trans Fat Ban Worked: Fast-Food Diners Are Eating Healthier

77 comments
michaelnaha
michaelnaha

I have been smoking three packs of cigarettes a day for 47 years and eating eggs all my life and just about what I wanted. I just went to the hospital and had test. I have all good cholesterol,good triglycerides and everything else is perfect. Full angiogram no clogged arteries or artery disease or blockages or any lung diseases or anything .I had all kinds of blood test for cancer and just about everything you can imagine.I had 6 ct scans from head to toe..now the only thing I worry about is the exposure to radiation  from the ct's . I think you got to eat and smoke and do what you want with your life and quit worrying..the internet is trying to scare everyone to death..that is worse for you than what you eat or smoke. I had a friend that was 57 ,never smoked ,wouldn't drive scared of people killing him in a car..went to the doctor with every ache and pain..was scared to death everyday of his life about dying from a disease or this or that. Was walking down a sidewalk and a truck came up on the sidewalk and he got hit throwing him through the windshield almost decapitating him and he died...so moral of the story is life is what you make of it..eat drink and be merry and stop worrying.,, 

JonnyMRX
JonnyMRX

I eat 70-80  whole eggs a week ,my cholesterol levels are low and no,people eating a lot of eggs don`t eat bacon ,exercise requires eggs...

SamanthaNBurton
SamanthaNBurton

@JonnyMRX Apparently you need eggs to have terrible grammar. Also your "point" is anecdotal evidence. I don't eat eggs (or any animal product) and exercise 4-6 times a week. BOOM anecdotal v anecdotal.

WillWillard
WillWillard

@JonnyMRX I noticed they didnt take this information in to account either (Lecithin is an emulsifier that helps fats mix with water and other body fluids. The NSEC says this enables lecithin disperse cholesterol in the blood stream, so it can be removed from the body, thus preventing atherosclerosis and heart disease.)  And we all know where lecithin comes from, thats right eggs!

srieyaone
srieyaone

Egg Yolks are as bad as Smokingfor more information

http://www.trendsor.blogspot.in/2012/12/egg-yolks-are-as-bad-as-smoking.html

It is known to everyone that smoking is very bad to heart and lungs and hence lead to coronary heart disease. Similarly, researchers are saying that eating egg yolk is very bad to heart that leads to a disease called coronary artery disease. A research was done on 1200 patients who eat egg yolk daily and they found that two-third of the... -

RichardWilson2
RichardWilson2

@srieyaone Even if this study is flawed there are other studies linking dairy and eggs to prostate cancer...

rbreau1
rbreau1

The "study" should not be called a study, it is a survey with no merit.  How were the eggs cooked?   Deep fried in bacon fat? Vegetable oil or were they cooked in water?  What else is part of the daily diet?   Lots of meat, any fish?   How much red wine do you usually consume in a week?   How much fish?   

sam_brit10
sam_brit10

All I know is, I've always had a problem with my cholesterol numbers, usually hovering around 240 ... I went low carb and ate lots of red meat, eggs, cheese, and almonds while avoiding starches and sugars ... next test I was at 180 with an HDL of 85, meaning my LDL cholesterol was only slightly higher than my HDL, a ration of about 60/40. OK, this is only anecdotal, but it convinced me that carbs are the culprit. (When I eased off on the low carbs, the numbers slid back towards where they had been.) That said, I don't know that my cholesterol counts have that much to do with potential heart disease. I'm more inclined to believe the more recent theories that posit that things like stress (which I handle poorly) cause inflammation in the arteries which in turn causes the plaque to cling more readily. So many variables! And the rules keep changing! I'm more in favor of just watching my sugars and enjoying my meals.

The Healthy Press
The Healthy Press

Curious as to what percentage of people who claim to eat egg yokes also have high casein protein diets such as red meat and milk??

Jeffrey Miller
Jeffrey Miller

I can say this.  The more eggs a person eats, then probably the more bacon they eat. And along with that, the more butter they consume.  Could it be that the exponential effects come from the fact that people who are eating eggs for breakfast routinely add bacon, sausage, buttery toast and possibly other things as well?

michaelmont2000
michaelmont2000

Question? Did they ever consider; even once! That adding exercise, taking vitamines, minerals and using organic eggs, might change the outcome? I wonder what the FDA paid them do do this study! Unbelievable!

michaelmont2000
michaelmont2000

Question? Did they ever consider; even once! That adding exercise, taking vitamines, minerals and using organic eggs, might change the outcome? I wonder what the FDA paid them do do this study! Unbelievable!

Yeshuratnam
Yeshuratnam

You just can't blame eggs alone. Many people live long by eating eggs. Researchers should visit a heart hospital and find out the causes for the death of patients. Most patients would have died for other reasons-- not for eating omelets.

Firozali A.Mulla
Firozali A.Mulla

Women lead but the economy is still lagging the

footing For millions of women around the world cooking the family meal is a

daily, dangerous chore. Sweating over smoky open stoves, they put their lives

and their children at risk every day. More

than three billion people, or 40 per cent of the planet's population, still

rely on open fires to cook, balancing a pot on top of some stones, under which

burns a fire fuelled by wood and coal, dung or left-over crops. The World Health Origination estimates that reliance on solid fuels is one of the 10

most important threats to public health. Some two million people die each year

from the effects of smoke inhalation, mainly children under the age of five who

fall prey to respiratory illness such as pneumonia. Environmental damage is huge as

forests are depleted and black carbon from inefficient fires counts for upwards

of 25 per cent of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, while homes

become coated in black grease. Now a global alliance, set up under the auspices

of the US State Department and the United Nations, is working

towards a goal of supplying 100 million clean cook stoves by 2020. "Half of the world is cooking

this way and it's kind of hard to believe we never thought this through

before," said Kris Balderston, whose office at the US State Department

helped set up the Global Alliance for

Clean Cook stoves. US

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has become the most public face of the public-private

partnership, and has so far cajoled some 36 countries to join either to

implement clean cook stoves at home or become donors. "This is one of the

solvable problems that we face in the world today," she has said. The alliance brings together

many partners: researchers to draw up standards on stoves, manufacturers to

make them, governments to promote awareness, NGOs to help distribute them and

financiers to help people afford them. But executive director Radha Muthiah

said one of the biggest hurdles was "the lack of a consistent set of

agreed-upon global standards -- health standards, safety standards, emissions

standards and efficiency standards." Launched

in September 2010, the alliance has developed a strategy for how to tackle the

problem called "Igniting Change" and has spent most of 2012 deciding

which nations to target initially. The final choice will be unveiled in

September, but is likely to include Tanzania and Kenya, and possibly Bangladesh

and maybe Vietnam. China

and India hold a special status in the alliance. Both have already run successful

clean cook stove programs, and can bring their experience to bear as well as

working towards upgrading existing stoves. I thank

you Firozali A.Mulla DBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monterey Chiropractor
Monterey Chiropractor

I've read about this a while ago, and there were a lot of qualms about the validity of their claim. Although, one thing I do wonder is, if the research team behind this study helps reset their participants back to a healthier point, especially those who had a massive plaque built up?

Shelagh Osh
Shelagh Osh

Why would any one risk coronary artery disease by eating eggs? You have safe and healthy perfect proteins such as beans.

Chickens are caged in giant dark warehouses to produce these unhealthy

heart attack bombs and are known as the most abused animals on Earth. Many of these tortured chickens have diseases and cancer. Eggs also expose you to salmonella. Factory farm created eggs (99% of all egg production) has no use for male hatchlings. These newborn babies are thrown into giant meat grinders or suffocated in a garbage bag. This is beyond obscene cruelty.

Shelagh Osh
Shelagh Osh

Why would any one risk coronary artery disease by eating eggs? You have safe and healthy perfect proteins such as beans.

Chickens are caged in giant dark warehouses to produce these unhealthy

heart attack bombs and are known as the most abused animals on Earth. Many of these tortured chickens have diseases and cancer. Eggs also expose you to salmonella. Factory farm created eggs (99% of all egg production) has no use for male hatchlings. These newborn babies are thrown into giant meat grinders or suffocated in a garbage bag. This is beyond obscene cruelty.

Shelagh Osh
Shelagh Osh

Why would any one risk coronary artery disease by eating eggs? You have safe and healthy perfect proteins such as beans. Chickens are caged in giant dark warehouses to produce these unhealthy heart attack bombs and are known as the most abused animals on Earth. Many of these tortured chickens have diseases and cancer. Eggs also expose you to salmonella. Factory farm created eggs (99% of all egg production) has no use for male hatchlings. These newborn babies are thrown into giant meat grinders or suffocated in a garbage bag. This is beyond obscene cruelty.

18235
18235

i just ate three pickled eggs, though i threw away the yolks.

Larry Weisenthal
Larry Weisenthal

Good grief, Dr. LaPuma..."poor quality...shouldn't have been published." ??? 

Yes, it's possible to criticize just about any research study -- and it IS possible to criticize every single diet/health study ever published.  But this study is extremely useful -- not as a definitive, final word, but as far as what might be called "hypothesis generating."

The strength of the study was the robust endpoint -- artery wall thickness (as opposed to the typical, very soft endpoints of serum lipid levels, inflammatory markers, etc.).  The authors took on the herculean task of measuring artery wall thickness in over 1,200 men.

Long term dietary recall studies are fraught with inexactitudes, but I'd wager that the average weekly consumption of eggs is one of the more constant features of a typical person's diet -- probably more constant, even, than breakfast meats, butter, trans fats, etc.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof.  This is a very ordinary claim -- to wit, that dietary cholesterol can contribute to the formation of cholesterol plaques. 

Of course, it's not definitive.  If you really love egg yolks, then it's a free country. Continue to eat them.  But there's absolutely no important dietary nutrient found in an egg yolk which is not readily available in foods without all the concentrated cholesterol.  For health conscious people who do not wish to wait 20 years for this to sort itself out, there is absolutely no health downside to ordering egg white veggie omelettes, as opposed to whole egg veggie (or veggie and cheese or veggie and meat) omelettes.  

- Larry Weisenthal/Huntington Beach CA

Baton Rouge Architect
Baton Rouge Architect

You can dissect ingredients and chemicals, but it is well documented how emotions have an impact on one's health.

If someone is in bliss eating eggs, and loving it, it could good for their health.

If they read this article first...maybe not so much...

Andrew Voznyak
Andrew Voznyak

Also, scientists proved that consumption of eggs negatively affects vision

Coronary Disease
Coronary Disease

Smoking and other " bad" lifestyle habits are bad for your health. Do what is natural. I would tell people to just use their common sense. Eggs are a great source for  protein in a balanced diet.

Most of the scientific studies are not so much helpful since they focus on a

little part of the whole. More information about coronary disease, what is is and what to do etc. you find on http://coronary-disease.com

silversprockit
silversprockit

i worked as a waitress at a diner in omaha for 3 years and one in florida for a year. i have a  le cordon bleu culinary education and now own an organic vegetable farm.

my experience says that people who eat egg yolks eat them in combination with fatty meat, buttered toast, and potatoes fried in butter substitute (read: transfat). people who choose egg whites avoid the hashbrowns and order their toast dry. numbers don't lie. btw, very low percentage of egg white eaters (slightly higher on sanibel, fl).in addition, most of the eggs we eat are from caged birds with at high grain diet. my girls are pastured with supplemental grain mash. studies show that pastured eggs contain 1/3 less cholesterol.

Raptorhead
Raptorhead

 This was not a scientific study.  It didn't isolate eggs from other variables.  It's a summary of a bunch of "surveys" people filled out.

Cholesterol in food doesn't turn into blood cholesterol.  Sugars and carbs are the primary source of bad cholesterol balance.

sscarzz
sscarzz

First there're bad, then good amp; bad again.  Just eat what makes you happy, You could get hit by a car or small meteor fall on you.

Terry
Terry

Heart disease started going up in the 1950's, around the same time as natural cooking oils (coconut, palm) were pushed away fr0m us because  of the encoachment of vegetable oils- corn, peanut, soy safflower, sunflower, with their manufacturers promises of better health. These new "vegetable oils" were being pushed by manfacturers because of the pant market collapse. These vegetabe oils were used in the manufacture of PAINT!, but were replaced with petroleum, which is why the vegetable oil market faced total ollapse. They told US Consumers that coconut and palm oils were unhealthy, but the opposite was true. As they forced coconut and palm oil out of the market, they replaced them with corn, peanut and safflower oil. 

We now know these "healthy" vegetable oils are some of the poorest choices we can make to eat. Most vegetable oil is rancid before it hits supermarket shelvs. When it starts to break down, it turns into a stiky substance that your body cannot get rid of completely. This sticky residue will cause blockage of arteries and the subsequent health problems: notably heart attack and stroke.

On the other hand, the good oils that do not break down are olive, coconut and palm. The body can handle those oils much more efficiently, and it is why those oils are actually good for you. It is also why butter is much better for you than margarine. Bet you haven't heard that before!

trafik25
trafik25

This is ridiculous. I just spent the past 2.5 months eating a high protein diet and eggs were the centerpiece...I lost more body fat and gained more muscle than on any other diet in my life. Got news for you egg haters, eggs make you and keep you fit. Obviously your body loves them. :)

Danyz
Danyz

Why is this considered news? This kind of statment goes back to the 70's. Eggs are probably nature's most perfect source of protein and other vital nutrients. Dump meat, eat eggs, and your arteries will be just fine. Anyway, here's a theory that may have just as much merit as any other so lightly tossed around these days. Since the 70's, this cholesterol egg scare has reduced average consumption of eggs. In this same time frame, various types of old age dementias have increased. So here's a correlation! Might it just be possible then that the combination of high density nutrients found in eggs is the most easily assimilated by the brain? Could this egg speicific nutrient bath then keep the brain healthier and thus able to stave off certain old age brain dysfuntions?

Mike
Mike

I have one or two eggs a week, but then I go several weeks without buying them. I don't desire them all the time anyway.

Talendria
Talendria

If you think about how eggs are usually served in America (on a McMuffin or with a side of greasy meat and fried potatoes), it's not surprising that people who regularly consume eggs develop heart disease.  You have to look at the big picture.

My favorite way to eat a whole egg is in a rice bowl with carrots, broccoli, snow peas, and chicken.  Healthy and delicious!

homebuilding
homebuilding

Medical science KNOWS that quite a bit more exercise than the average American gets is a really, really good thing (with a great deal of reserarch verification).

Medical science KNOWS that losing weight to get down to the recommended averages is a really good thing, too.

Medical science KNOWS that lowered caloric input is associated with greater longevity.

Therefore, enjoy a bit of booze, a couple of eggs, some meat, some veggies, some gravy and biscuits, as you wish, but in noticeably lesser amounts than is customary for us....with well more daily movement and exercise than is our average.

It's really about that simple....

and don't  automatically take every RX given by the doc, IF above healthy weight and lowered caloric intake are NOT part of your regular discussions

opensets
opensets

Well.....technically you can show association has a high probability of being causation under certain circumstances. I'm not sure if the research did that though. Not paying money to read that article.

RobertPPruitt
RobertPPruitt

 Hah, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that medical science is bad science. They change what is good or bad for you so often you can't keep track of it. First eggs were horrible for you due to the high cholesterol, then the cholesterol in eggs was different and it didn't have any affect on  "blood cholesterol" , and now these people are trying to say it's horrible again for the same reason it was in the beginning. Retarded at best. Look at salt. For decades we were told how bad salt was for us and we needed to cut back. Now we are finding out that people who eat less salt have a GREATER chance of dying from heart disease! And read this: "when salt intake is cut, the body responds by releasing renin and

aldosterone, an enzyme and a hormone, respectively, that increase blood

pressure."

I eat almost no veg. oil(only canola and olive) but in an average week I do eat 1.5LB+ butter, chicken(always with skin) hamburger meat(drain very little of the fat off) beef and pork(and LOVE eating the crunchy fat on both) and well over a pound of whole milk cheeses, 2 gallons of whole milk, not to mention a little sour cream and cream cheese(never low fat)and about a pint of mayonnaise.

The "normal" range for cholesterol is 100-199. I'm at a shocking 202. I say shocking because after I told my DR. what I ate he couldn't believe it was that low(I became anorexic 5 years ago after nerve damage from a surgery killed my appetite, so I also eat a lot of high fat foods to help boost my calorie intake.

I also started smoking at 10YO(42 now) . X-rays done last year to help rule out other causes of my anorexia showed my lungs to be quite clear, which also got a double take from my DR. when I told him how long I had smoked.(btw if anyone wants to know why tobacco isn't the real main reason that heart and lung disease is so high percentage wise now compared to in the past even though a lower percentage of people smoke, although it is unhealthy for you, and what the real reason is just email me at lordgarion514@gmail.com . And I'll list it all out and give references where needed.

The thing is, I have always preferred home cooking over packaged highly processed  "junk food" that we are told is healthy for us. And I have always worked hard(I mean really worked hard, not that BS that people who sit behind a desk all day and get mentally tired say is "hard work", there is a very real difference, not that using your mind in an office all day isn't mentally draining because it is, but the body needs lots of activity, anything else is bad for your physical health). The body can use just about any and all food you shove into it with very few side affects  IF you use your body. There's a reason why it's almost unheard of for a 20 something smoker who has a physically demanding job to keel over with a heart attack but it is becoming  pretty common for 20 somethings who do AND do not smoke who sit at a desk all day and then watch T.V. or get on the net all night to have heart attacks.

Go back a couple hundred years in America when ALL food was organic NON-gmo. It was quite common for people to live into their 70's-80's. The reason the average was so low is because of childhood diseases(for which there were no vaccines) and infections(for which there was no antibiotics. A simple paper cut could literally kill you by becoming infected leading to blood poisoning). The people who ate bacon and eggs every morning and beef, pork and chicken daily had very little heart or lung disease whether they smoked or not(although smokers had a little more than non, it was nowhere near as bad as it is now. The main reasons for the drastic increase now over then is one, coal power plants pump radioactive polonium 209 into the air and the entire planet is literally covered in it and smokers eat it in all their food just like non smokers do, but smokers also take it into their lungs(that's bad btw). Secondly almost all the plants(and animals because they eat the same food we do) we consume are grown with synthetic fertilizers and pesticides made from crude oil(btw vitamin and mineral supplements that aren't organic are also made from crude oil) .

The human body is not "designed" to ingest ANY(much less the large quantities we are) processed foods, which throws the balance of the nutrients right out the window,  a balance our bodies have spent many thousands of years becoming dependent upon to function properly.

Is it any wonder science has such a hard time nailing down exactly what is going on? We grow our crops with oil based nutrients/poisons, we feed the animals we eat foods they are not capable of processing correctly and so we pump them full of many different synthetic chemicals so they can cope with the diet we force upon them and then we eat the meat that results from all this unnatural tinkering. Wanna see something cool? Look up the nutrition information for a regular run of the mill steak(beef) then look up the same steak but from an organically grass fed cow. Know what you will find? The grass fed beef has a little less bad fat, a little more good fat AND grass fed beef even contains Omega 3 amp; 6 fatty acids. That's right, cows grown properly have the same heart healthy fats as the coveted cold water fish they tell us to eat because the fats they contain are so healthy for us(although beef contains less of it)

So eat natural unprocessed foods and get out there and work HARD or at least exercise hard almost every dayfor several hours. Do this and you can really cut back on the amount of worrying you do about your health and you will be healthier.

Sorry for the rant.

And here is the link about salt that I stated above.

http://www.scientificamerican....

Jo Løvbrøtte
Jo Løvbrøtte

If you eat broccoli every day...........together with a bottle of vodka.......you are likely to die sooner than later! Hence.......eating broccoli will cause an early death!

It could be the toast or english muffin you always have with your eggs that has the name Culprit written all over it!

Then again........how would I know!

Research like this should be printed on toiletpaper!

Joe McEwan
Joe McEwan

have any of these DRs bothered asking their patients if they have been cooking their eggs in bacon fat or butter? Cuz it does make a difference.

Oso Wallman
Oso Wallman

suggests. may, supports. are far from conclusive yet we jump to conclusions with little trepidation and at the speed of fear. dig deeper. poor journalsim, leading with a shocking conclusion that is followed by why it's bad science. 

John La Puma MD
John La Puma MD

It's a shame that research of this poor caliber makes it way through the peer-review process to be promoted as another nutritional insight.  It's not.

It just confuses my patients even more, so that some of them say "Yesterday they were good, today they're bad, I might as well have the Lucky Charms."  

Here's the rubber-hits-the-road truth: eggs are a great food. They're high in protein, easy to cook and store, and even portable (if they're hard-boiled...a great snack). 

They're low calorie, and can be flavored with chilies, mustard, sour cream or salt and pepper. You have to eat at least a dozen weekly to boost your LDL, and if that concerns you, just eat the whites.

And they're still inexpensive, and easy to make. 

Drew William
Drew William

As a vegetarian, I would really like these studies to include more information about how eggs affect people who eat meat differently. When looking at people's cholesterol levels, shouldn't we be considering the whole of their diet? Someone who typically consumes eggs as part of a diet high in red meat probably should probably be set apart from others in the study who might not eat red meat and those who might not eat meat at all. I always looked at eggs as a sensible source of proteins and vitamins, and aware that my cholesterol levels should be lower than most due to a diet that consists mostly of vegetables, grains, and eggs, have always thought that I would be fine to have a couple of eggs a day. Unfortunately, it's unclear as to what is a safe amount for anyone, since diets vary significantly from person to person.