Family Matters

Underage Teen Sex: Is a Girl Being Prosecuted for Being Gay?

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Teen romance is tough enough when you’re not accused of breaking the law.

But that’s exactly the predicament Kaitlyn Hunt, a high school senior from Sebastian, Fla., finds herself in. Hunt, 18, was arrested Feb. 16 for dating her girlfriend, who was 14 when the alleged crime was committed. She’s charged with lewd and lascivious battery on a victim aged 12 to 16 by a person over the age of 18, a second-degree felony that carries a possible prison term of 15 years per count.

The case has generated a good bit of Internet buzz for understandable reasons. There’s sex involved — and underage, lesbian sex at that — along with loud cries of injustice from the family of Kaitlyn Hunt.

Whether or not the charges are fueled by homophobia, of course, is difficult to prove. That may be why gay rights organizations are keeping their distance. In what appears to convey uneasiness over the age difference between the two girls, advocacy groups that are typically quick to jump up and defend presumed offenses aimed at the gay community are keeping quiet. The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force did not respond to requests for interviews, and the American Civil Liberties Union declined comment.

For her part, Hunt, a cheerleader and basketball player, isn’t denying their relationship, but she and her family are convinced the severity of the charges are a reflection of anti-gay bias. Her father has taken to the Internet in a search for sympathy, posting a petition on Change.org calling on Assistant State Attorney Brian Workman to “stop the prosecution of an 18-year-old girl in a same-sex relationship.”

More than 300,000 people have signed the petition, one of Change.org’s most popular. In it, Steven Hunt writes:

Kaitlyn’s girlfriend’s parents are pressing charges because they are against the same-sex relationship, even though their daughter has stated that this is a consensual relationship.

…[S]he’s been expelled from school and is facing serious felonies — all because she is in love. If convicted, she could end up in jail or live under house arrest, will have to register as a sex offender, and live her life as a convicted felon.

For their part, the family of Kaitlyn’s ex-girlfriend — the judge ordered no contact between the girls after the arrest — dismisses any connection between the charges and the fact that the couple was in a lesbian relationship. “The controversy is misguided,” says Charles Sullivan Jr., the family’s attorney, in State v. Hunt. “It’s totally irrelevant. When Kaitlyn was 18, she had sex with a 14-year-old minor. She has admitted to that. If an adult has sex with a minor, it’s breaking the law.”

(MORE: Bullying: For Gay and Lesbian Teens, Does Life Get Better After School?)

States vary widely when it comes to cracking down on under-age relationships. Florida’s law is at the strict end of the spectrum: if you’re under 16, you can’t technically consent to sex. Other states, like Georgia, consider sex between two consenting teens to be a misdemeanor.

On Friday, Kaitlyn Hunt turned down a plea deal that would have sentenced her to two years of house arrest in exchange for admitting to two counts of felony child abuse. The plea would have meant she could go out only to attend school or go to work. No grocery store trips unless previously scheduled and greenlighted, and she would have been subject to lie detector tests, sex offender evaluations and other checks on her freedom. “It’s just ridiculous,” says her lawyer, Julia Graves. “She did not want to accept the fact that she’d have a felony record.”

Along those lines, the case raises interesting questions of how much teens are expected to know about which relationships are above board and which could land them in jail. Hunt had no idea that she was doing anything wrong, says Graves. “Now she knows that she violated the law, but then it was just a romantic relationship between two girls attending high school together,” she says.

Graves also points out that similar cases between boys and girls seem to have netted more lenient charges. “It’s hard to believe she’s been treated fairly,” says Graves. “We don’t have actual proof but we believe we haven’t been able to work it out because the other parents were unhappy with the relationship.”

What does seem clear is that for both girls, the court battle is an unsavory end to a romance that took root on the basketball court. Kaitlyn Hunt is attending an alternative school. Her college plans are on hold. And she’s barred by court order from seeing her former girlfriend. If nothing else, her situation has likely raised awareness among Florida teens of what relationships are appropriate — and which ones are better to avoid, regardless of sexual orientation.

(MOREHow the Gay-Marriage Victories Are (Slowly) Transforming the Notion of Family)

179 comments
bulksmsbase
bulksmsbase

Thanks very much for this great article;this is the stuff that keeps me going through out these day.

bevjohnson74
bevjohnson74

The law is the law, so this girl broke the law.  The law also says that it doesn't care if she didn't know the other girls age or if she didn't know that it was illegal.  She won't win and will have to serve some time in prison for her ignorance and immaturity.  

My son, who didn't realize the same thing, till I told him to get rid of the relationship that he had with a girl too young.  He was 18 and she was 14.  He did break it off, but not soon enough.  She was a runaway and found out where he was and the police, in looking for her, found them together and he was arrested.  He is serving his time in prison at the young age of 19.  Growing up fast.  He will have to be on the sex offenders registry for 10 years.  His life is forever ruined, because he fell in love with a girl in his school.  Where we live, they have the middle school and high school mixed together.  This is how they met.  

I agree that he broke the law and must pay for this.  But I DO NOT agree with putting him on the sex offender registry that will make the rest of his life a living hell.  He made one mistake and is paying for it for the rest of his life.  So many kids(and I call them kids, as they are not all mature enough to understand how great the consequences are) have suffered for some experimenting.  Even John Walsh (Adam Walsh Act/ Americas Most Wanted) had a relationship in his college years with a girl.  He was 23 and the girl had a fake ID and was only 15.  He is good with it and doesn't care.  He got away with it.  But the sex offender registry is still here.  Bloated with kids, like my son.  No one can tell who is a violent offender or a kid who had sex with his girlfriend.  All you will see is a charge of "Rape of a Child 3"  Now, he will be thought of as a pervert or predator, which he is not.  He will have trouble finding stable work or a home.  He will be shunned and maybe even be hurt physically.  Maybe you don't care about that, but think about this...At the rate that the registry is filling up with offenders (some as young as 10 years old) charged of all kinds of ridiculous charges (broad brush justice), it is only a matter of a few more years and every citizen of this fine country we live in, will have someone that they know or a family member on it.  I do think that the registry needs to be a tool only for law enforcement, not for the public who don't really know how to distinguish between offenders and live with  make-believe thinking  that they are safer because it is there.  The name "Sheeple" fits here.  

Get educated.  Our nation is driven by unrealistic fear.  Fear of the "boogieman" (sex offender).  Time to grow up and realize that the registry doesn't work.  It does ruin lives and families, that otherwise would've been productive and serving.  

I feel for this girl and her family, but society needs their blood.  Barbaric.

MichaelFrost
MichaelFrost

It's about age. When an 18 yr young MAN was interested in my 15 yr old GIRL. I informed him I would throw him in jail after I kicked his ass. He left her alone. Protect your children fools!

Geiselbgg
Geiselbgg

The law is different in every state. When I was in HS i dated boys who were seniors when I was a freshman. That was however before dating meant sex. Times have changed and while I feel the law needs to be changed the fact is in many states if you are 18 (considered an adult) then sex with someone under the age of 15 is considered statutory rape. Parents need to learn the law in their states and educate their children accordingly.

Mirinda@MakeMyPlate
Mirinda@MakeMyPlate

This is shocking either if it was boy and girl or girl and girl/boy and boy the fact is the relationship was consensual she did not do anything wrong and does not deserve jail time - yes 14 years is young but it is old enough to say no or yes to a relationship - the fact that this law can lead to max 15 years jail time is crazy people who commit actual crimes get way less such as rape, murder etc! 

AlexiaNguyen
AlexiaNguyen

If an 18 yrs old boy has sex with a 14 yrs old girl, he will go to jail and will be listed on the sex offender list.  Why would it be any different between an 18 yrs old girl having sex with a 14 yrs old girl?  Why should she be treated differently?  She should go go jail and be treated as a sex offender.  There is vastly differences between an 18 yrs old and a 14 yrs old when it comes to brain/emotional development.

SpinettaC
SpinettaC

It's pretty gross how people are choosing their language to contort the case to fit their agenda--"two high schools girls having consensual sex" sounds a lot different from "an adult committing statutory rape against a minor"--the craziest thing is neither of these are inaccurate, at least in Florida!

Clearly, when the same act is a heinous crime in one state and perfectly legal in another, we've got a problem.

This is so clearly an issue with homophobia at its heart--the younger girl's parents probably wouldn't have cared nearly as much if Kate was a man (but who knows with these vindictive people), and based on the comments I suspect a lot of the people against Kate don't care about saving the children so much as they just want to forward their hateful agenda.

I feel horrible for these girls--if I were the younger I'd never speak to my parents again, and it must be really painful for both of the girls to be forced apart with no chance to communicate. I hope Kate writes a book. If I were going through something this difficult I'd definitely want my boyfriend there.

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

I'm a little confused...the article mentions at one point that the girls involved were both in the same high school at the time?

I'm not saying it's okay, it's just...I've also seen cases of senior boys dating underclass girls and getting labeled as sex offenders, even though there was consent from both parties and they were dating like any other classmates would be.  Furthermore, since both were still in high school, most of society considers both to still be children and peers in nearly all areas...except sex, where the older party is magically an adult taking advantage of a child.

It sounds like this may have been one of those awkward cases where the older party happened to hit the cut-off age sometime during the school year, and is now considered a sex offender because of it.  I'm honestly not sure that that's really fair to either of them.

It has nothing to do with them being lesbian, because I feel it's just as wrong when a 17-year-old boy and a 15-16 year old girl are dating in high school, and everything is completely okay...until the boy turns 18 in the middle of the school year, while still dating the girl who didn't turn 16 until a couple months later.  Suddenly, despite both still being in high school and therefore considered by most to still be children (BOTH of them), it's suddenly statutory rape?

Maybe they should raise the cut-off age to 19?  I don't recall there being any 19 year olds in my high school, so that cut-off age makes a whole lot more sense to me than 18.  I also know several states (including my own) have laws that say the measure of statutory rape isn't just one party being a legal adult (by virtue of turning 18), but it's also the age gap.  I think the age gap cut-off is five years, so if and older teen and a younger teen started dating when both were under 18, it's still legal for them to date when one comes of age as long as the age gap is five years or less (which it is in the case).

FLRefugee
FLRefugee

I've been obsessing about this case ever since I learned about it, and I think it's because I am the parent of a teenager.  Based on everything I have read about this matter, I've determined my own partial list of dos and don'ts for present and future reference:

1.  DO have multiple conversations with my teen about what we consider to be wise, ethical sexual choices.  Do lots of listening, but make my expectations and standards clear.  Set clear limits!

2.  DON'T assume that other parents of teens in my child's life are on the same page as me and my teen regarding what wise, ethical sexual choices are. 

3.  DO keep my eyes and ears open 24/7 regarding what my teen is up to, who my teen associates with, where my teen is, why my teen chooses certain friends, and how my teen is handling their relationships with other teens.  Be highly observant about who my teen is attracted to and who is attracted to my teen.

4.  DON'T create a Facebook page, a Change.org petition or create any other online document to deliberately spread misinformation about a mistake my teen made in the vain hope of sparing my teen the consequences of a poor decision.

5.  DO have multiple conversations with my teen about the differences between real love, infatuation, a crush, and simple lust, and how to manage those feelings without making unwise decisions.

6.  DON'T involve the police in my parenting challenges unless I am prepared to completely sacrifice the privacy and dignity of me and my teen for the rest of our lives. 


punkakes13
punkakes13

the thing is, if the 14 had the consent rom the parents nothing would happen.. it all evovles around the consentment, not the fact.. cant u see? which is absolutaly ridiculous, and hypocrite, since one owns it own body

punkakes13
punkakes13

when i was 14 i had a sort of a mind.. a mind where i could decide what to do with my body

i dot understand when people treat some teenagers as child, because, i dont know what mind did they have in their teenager times, but surely, was different from mine hahahah

JudithKLittles
JudithKLittles

This girl is not being persecuted, she is being prosecuted for having a sexual relationship with an underage person. So, we are supposed to overlook this type of behavior when it is gay people who are breaking the law? Shei shoud be prosecuted because she is an adult having an inappropriate relationship relationship with a child.

Laura_PH
Laura_PH

This isn't about gay rights. It's about parental rights and responsibility. Do we or do we not want to empower parents to keep their 14-year-olds from "consensually" having sex with anyone clever enough to talk them into it?  18 year olds are adults. They can live independently from their parents, marry, enlist, sign contracts, and vote.  14 year olds are not adults, which is why our society doesn't permit them to do any of those things. If we're now going to decide as a society that 18 year olds are just too babyfied to be held accountable for their actions (and before she was arrested, Kaitlyn Hunt KNEW and admitted on social media that what she was doing to the 14 year old was illegal, proof via http://supporthonesty.net) then we need to rescind some of the rights 18 year olds are currently enjoying. If 18 year olds are children, then let them be treated as children.

Disco_House
Disco_House

18 - 14 in a boy girl relationship would be wrong: so equality means this affair was wrong.

peterhulme
peterhulme

the law is the law, the age of consent is their to protect the vulnerable from sexual predators like Kaitlyn Hunt.

let this be a warning to all you sick people.

Hadrewsky
Hadrewsky

Punishment is out of whack... I'd even give her a year of jail time but she is not a sex offender

lazarus00000
lazarus00000

If this were a male 18 yo who had sex witha 13yo boy or girl for that matter, would you even discuss this subject? Some how women are accorded a different set of expectaions where girl on girl seems to be alright.

Just wondering

Lazarus

AimanJarrar
AimanJarrar

I'm 100% in support of gay/lesbian marriage and relationships. However, if this was a man and a girl no one would be saying ANYTHING. This is wrong. They had underage sex, PERIOD. Those who are gay/lesbian want the same rights as a straight couple, so treat them similar when it comes to age of consent.

mjerin2
mjerin2

What is the deal with Florida??! There's always something horrible happening.  But this incident in my opinion is just not that big of a deal.  My HS boyfriend was 18, I was 15 and we had plenty of consentual fun.  So what?  The parents are blowing it out of proportion.  They obviously have no control over their child and they are using the State to help dicipline.  Unfortunately it is at the expense of the other girl's future.  She may as well plead not guilty, because in a state where a jury could let a sociopath like Caset Anthony go free...anything could happen.

Random_acct
Random_acct

No, it's not a clear case of homophobia. Of course, gays love to pull the victim card.

FLRefugee
FLRefugee

@RekkaRiley  Actually, in this particular instance, the older girl was 18 before the school year began.  The younger girl was 14.  The arrest affidavit is available online.  

I was pondering this some more as I had the opportunity to spend time with some teenagers in a social setting yesterday, varying in ages from 18 to 13.  I couldn't honestly say I considered any of the 18 year olds to be real adults - yet legally, they are considered adults.  And if one of them were having sex with my 14 year old, I think I would be livid.  Another thing I was thinking about is that in the State of Florida, in a divorced parent situation if an 18 year old is still a senior in high school, a custodial parent may continue to receive child support for that 18 year old until they have graduated from high school, so long as they are living at home...so at least in that context, an 18 year old is not considered to be a legal adult, but a dependent.  I really need to just stop thinking about this case.  

SpinettaC
SpinettaC

@FLRefugee Wanting to prevent your kid from making life-altering mistakes is understandable, but trying to coax a teenager into opening up about their social life is like prying open a clam with your bare hands (I'm in college and I still don't feel comfortable talking about all of that with my parents). Monitoring every detail of your teen's relationships with their friends/partners/crushes/frenemies is not only inadvisable, but impossible (without a P.I., anyway... but that definitely wouldn't end well)

I think if you want to be kept in the loop about your kid's social life, the best (well, only) way to do this is to have reasonable expectations (would you have wanted to give your parents hourly updates in high school?), and foster a positive relationship so they feel comfortable coming to you to talk about their life of their own accord without fear of being judged (or grounded, etc.).

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@peterhulme How was she a sexual predator?

She was dating a classmate and was not aware that the age gap was illegal. Both of the girls involved saw it as a relationship between equal peers, not between an adult and a child.

Here's a newsflash:  Most American high school students are completely unaware that dating a senior classmate might be illegal.  They don't think of themselves in terms of "this person is 14 and this person is 18," they think in terms of "this person is a sophomore and this person is a senior, that's only a two-year difference."

The real problem that I see is that we have people who are legally considered adults, but are legally required to attend school with people who are NOT legally adults.

Bump up the age of adulthood to 19, or 20-21 if you want to be really safe.  That way you don't have adults who still instinctively view underage classmates as equal peers.

AlessandraBarros
AlessandraBarros

@Hadrewsky  

The Roman Polanski types have all found this article! 

If you sexually exploit children, you're a sex offender. Hopefully the judge won't have your  predatory views of child sex.

Hadrewsky
Hadrewsky

I also was 19 and she was 16... dont think we regretted it for a damn second.

sure they are immature at that age and even a bit younger.... but they have a relationship that cannot result in pregnancy followed by punishment that is out of line. 

and the religious crusader's should put their heads up their bumms because their authority based upon a poorly written book is laughable.

Taxpayer
Taxpayer

@lazarus00000 

 Women/girls want to be equal, except when they don't want to be.  And people wonder why divorce is a problem in this country.  

Disco_House
Disco_House

@mjerin2 18 - 15 with sexual relations is rape whether boy girl or girl girl or boy boy.  

AlessandraBarros
AlessandraBarros

@mjerin2  

Simply because you don't think children have rights not to be targeted for sex, it doesn't change the fact that they do.

If LGBT people want to rape and molest minors as they please, it is a big deal. And part of their future needs to be ruined. That's what should happen when adults target kids for sex. 

 Kaitlyn can plead not guilty all she wants, but she  has already confessed to the crime to police. She's guilty.

 

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@FLRefugee @RekkaRiley Thanks for the clarification!  

I think the whole age-of-consent thing needs to be fixed.  It varies so much from state to state, with so many random exceptions that even the authorities that are supposed to enforce the law aren't usually aware of...it's a mess.

Then there's the whole mess with the age of adulthood being 18, which means you have people who are legal adults but are still required by law to attend school with people who are still legally children, they're still legally required to act as children in the context of parental custody or even working, etc. 

And speaking from experience, if you're in a typical American high school (at least here in the PNW), it's not only completely normal to have friends of all grades, but it can be very difficult sometimes to remember that your younger, underclassmen friends by age and not grade level.  Students tend to think in terms of "he/she is a sophomore and he/she is a senior, that's only two years difference," without realizing that the actual age difference might be much larger.

Then there's the complication of younger students who act mature for their age (which again, makes it difficult sometimes to remember their actual age because they're defying the stereotype of obnoxious teenagers), and being lesbian means the dating prospects are often slim to none even if the school has a GLBT club (which a lot of them don't).  So...I don't personally see Ms. Hunt's actions as "taking advantage of someone who didn't know any better (which is the reason/definition of statutory rape)." 

 It was impulsive, certainly, but both of them probably saw it first and foremost as "a lesbian classmate who is interested in me?  Finally!"  Most high school students wouldn't stop to consider the legal ramifications (if they're even aware of them at all), because they think if they're in the same level of schooling then it must be okay.  Most high school kids I've known do firmly believe that relationship between high school students and either college students or junior high students (with the borderline exception of a high school senior dating a college freshman that they already knew from the same school) as off-limits, or at the very least extremely uncomfortable.  So it's not like a total lack of standards, they do understand that too much of an age gap is clearly wrong.  They just don't understand that you can have an illegal age gap within the same school.

If we really want to prevent cases like this, maybe we should either bump age of legal adulthood up to 19 or adjust public school levels down so that everyone graduates high school by 17?

FLRefugee
FLRefugee

I agree that prying into a teen's social life is fruitless and ill-advised - however, being observant and aware is not inappropriate, and can be accomplished without asking your teen embarrassing questions.  (Although at times, asking the tough questions is a necessary part of being a parent.)  I agree that fostering a positive relationship is one key to good communication between parents and teenagers.  Keeping your eyes and ears open as a parent does not mean forcing your teenager to open up - it means paying attention to what is going on with your teenager.  To do otherwise (in my opinion) is irresponsible. 

mjerin2
mjerin2

@RekkaRileyWell said.  I totally agree.  I have an 18 yo still in high school, and I don't consider him an adult yet, nor do I treat him like one.

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@AlessandraBarros @Hadrewsky Wasn't Roman Polanski a 40-year-old dating an 18-year-old?

That's a much bigger age gap than we're talking about here.

If Ms. Hunt were a college freshman, or if she'd graduated high school before she started dating the other girl, I could see the problem.

But that is not what happened.  They were classmates, that's all they saw, and neither of them was aware that the relationship was illegal.

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@Taxpayer @lazarus00000 That's not what's going on.

If it were an 18 year old of either gender dating a 13 year old of either gender, it would be wrong in every state because the younger student would be a freaking junior high kid!

The younger girl here was not thirteen, she was 14.  She was attending the same high school as Ms. Hunt.  In my state, the age gap would be small enough that it wouldn't be considered statutory rape at all unless the older student had graduated.

And yes, there have been cases of an 18 year old boy dating a 14-15 year old girl that were brought before the courts in my state, and the relationship was deemed perfectly legal because both parties were considered to be in the same peer group by virtue of attending the same high school together, and the age gap was withing the legal parameters.

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@Disco_House @mjerin2 

Not in every state.

Certainly not in Washington State.  As long as the age gap is less than 5 years, and the younger member of the couple is no younger than 14, then this case would not be considered rape at all.

mjerin2
mjerin2

@Disco_House I disagree.  Rape is not consentual.  This is not a case about rape, the younger girl admitted to the consentual relationship. 

FLRefugee
FLRefugee

@SpinettaC @FLRefugee  Ah, no worries. I definitely agree with you, parents can go way too far in being protective, and actually make it much harder for their kids to feel comfortable opening up to them.  As a parent, I find it challenging to find the right balance.  I wonder if the parents in this case might possibly be able to communicate and arrive at some mutually satisfactory resolution without this matter going to trial.  I sincerely hope so for both families' sakes.

SpinettaC
SpinettaC

@FLRefugee I see, gotcha!

Sorry to jump down your throat, in high school I had friends whose well-meaning parents took it a step too far and their kids ended up sort of stunted in some ways, or acted out and made really dumb choices as soon as they were out from under their parents' thumb. But the way you described it sounds reasonable.

RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@mjerin2 @RekkaRiley What's even more weird about the whole "18 = legal adult" thing?

Even legally, it is not even remotely consistent.

At 18, you can vote, you can join the military, you can smoke tobacco, and you can apparently be charged with statutory rape...

But you can't claim yourself on your taxes. (You're legally considered a dependent until age 19, or until age 23 if you're a full-time student.  And it doesn't matter if your parents don't actually claim your exemption, you still don't get to claim your own until you're at least 19).

You're legally required to stay in high school in most states.

And I'm sure there's a lot more than that, I just can't remember straight off the top of my head.

It's a crazy system that clearly isn't working.


RekkaRiley
RekkaRiley

@GaySpecking "There is a big difference between a 14 and 18 year old."

And yet we legally require that they attend the same school?

High school students see themselves as just that: high school students.  They don't think in terms of age or maturity, they think in terms of "sophomore/junior/senior."

You want to prevent these sorts of relationships?  Rearrange the grade system so that everyone graduates by age 17.

Most high school students are smart enough to know that a relationship between a high school student and someone who has already graduated is wrong.

mjerin2
mjerin2

@BobSheepleherder I am not intending to debate the legality of the issue.  The law is obviously the law. And I do, however,  believe that a 14 year is capable of discerning predatory behavior. I go back to my original statement which I think is at the heart of the issue: The younger girl's parents don't have control, there are most likely deeper family issues at hand...why else would she run away?? They are using the law to gain control.   Why else wait to report the so-called violation of their kid until after the "purpetrator" turned 18??

mjerin2
mjerin2

@AlessandraBarros I'm not ignorant, and homosexuality IS normal for some people.  2 HS students touching each other is not the same as adults having sex with children.

AlessandraBarros
AlessandraBarros

For people who see children as dogs that they can rape in any way they wish, inserting any object they wish into them, it's hard to see what is the problem with statutory rape. Sex for them is cheap, people are all cheap, like dogs really, and so sexual exploitation of kids is normal. Sex that involves no maturity, respect, or a healthy attitude is also what they endorse. 

These are the people who promote the sexual exploitation and degradation of kids and sex. 

GaySpecking
GaySpecking

There are emotional consequences. There is a big difference in maturity between a 14 and 18 year old. The 14 year old may not be gay but may have a girl crush and this may be very confusing for her.

Hadrewsky
Hadrewsky

@BobSheepleherder


Outside of of VD (and lesbian sex has little VD transmission) what "tremendous consequences could have happened? no pregnancy was possible so what is so horrible?

that they might end up gay so what?

outside of that I think the worst consequence would have been a little chafing.

Tremendous consequences my butt

BobSheepleherder
BobSheepleherder

@mjerin2 @AlessandraBarros You may not think it's "predatory", but it is illegal, and for good reason. The reason we, as a society, create these laws is because we feel a 14 year old is not competent to decide what is or isn't predatory. It is not up to the perpetrator or the victim to make that decision. Both parties to this act were obviously incapable of making an intelligent decision on the matter or they would have decided not to do it. Anything else is an excuse. These two, and apparently you, decided to break the law and do something that could possibly carry tremendously bad consequences. Just because you ended up having "fun" is beside the point. That you did it is PROOF that you, and they, were incapable of intelligently considering of the consequences of breaking the law.

AlessandraBarros
AlessandraBarros

@mjerin2 @AlessandraBarros  

It takes a lot of ignorance to normalize homosexuality and call other people "homophobic"  And it takes a twisted mind to think that having sex with children is normal.